Thursday, 13 June 2013

Mid-Summer Roses

So, we have reached Mid-Summer, which in gardening terms is a great marker point.
The beds should be full of glorious colour and if you are wise, scent too.
One of my favourite plants for scent is of course the rose, which despite being just an ugly stick for 5 months of the year - as described by the previous head of the RHS - has the remarkable reputation of being one of Britain`s favourite plants.

It is not without reason that roses have such a special place in our hearts.
They have been in cultivation for thousands of years; indeed the Babylonians and Egyptians had them and they are mentioned in the Bible, Tora and Quoran as well as Shakespeare and other literature. The English crown of course has a white and red rose as it`s symbol of unity and the Empress Josephine had one of the greatest rose gardens in history - which was sadly destroyed during the Franco-Prussian War. If you like roses and want to plant them in your garden, look at the David Austin or Peter Beales catalogues for ideas - there are others, but these are the best.
Read carefully, deciding on flowering time, scent, colour or height.
Personally I love sticking my nose in a rose and smelling that particular fruit scent you get with some of the dark reds like ‘Ena Harkness’ or ‘Crimson Glory’. “In general, roses with the best scents are darker colors, have more petals, and have thick or velvety petals” – to quote Dr.
Leonard Perry of Vermont University.
But there are down-sides. Thanks to the introduction of the `Persian Yellow` variety, we now have many plants that are susceptible to fungus such as black spot. Which means if we want perfect rose leaves, we have to spray with toxic fungicides. There is also the problem of leaf pests such as the Rose Leaf-Rolling Sawfly, which has usually done it`s damage by mid-July and is very difficult to eradicate.
The aphid is also a major problem from March onwards, effecting not only the leaf, but also the flower buds and the residue proves a great host for yet more fungus. These can be sprayed against with a systemic insecticide, but given we are talking about a plant that attracts bees, I suggest you try not to.
There are some methods which supposedly put pests off. The planting of parsley, calendula and alliums all aid the gardener in his or her attempts to ward off pests. I am also told a garlic spray mixed with crushed and boiled horse-tail acts as a good insecticide and fungicide.
But to be honest the best thing one can do with your roses is enjoy them for what they are. Appreciate the variety of flora and fauna that the rose attracts. We look at an oak and understand it provides a home for thousands of animals, fungi and mosses, so why look at a rose any differently?
As long as it is fed well and pruned at the correct time, it will go on giving the pleasure of flowers and structure to even the smallest of gardens.

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